Being an extrovert at work and in meeting

by | Sep 13, 2016 | Teamwork, Workplace Wellness

Last Updated on 3 March 2022

Extroverts are everywhere, promoted and visible

Being an extrovert at work is an asset. As previously mentioned in our article on introverts, today’s society greatly prefers extroverts.

Every day, the media blows us away with stories of people who don’t hesitate to step up and take their place. They always seem to be at ease in front of the camera and have an excellent sense of repartee. It’s as if they don’t need to think before they speak.

You probably won’t be surprised to learn that many famous people fit into the extrovert category. Just think of ex-US president Bill Clinton, Apple founder Steve Jobs, and businessman Richard Branson.

In the workplace, there is a strong emphasis on the benefits of teamwork, and people are encouraged to stand out and go for it. It is therefore obvious that extroverts have an easier time finding their place and integrating into society.

By the end of this article, you’ll finally be able to tell what makes extroverts different at work, even if you already have a little idea about it.

What are the personality traits that define an extrovert?

As you might expect, extroverts are generally easy to recognize. Of course, there are times when they are not exactly what you think they are. It is indeed possible to be both shy and extroverted, although this phenomenon is far from reaching a majority of extroverts.

While introverts need quiet and solitude to recharge their batteries, extroverts recharge their energies when they are surrounded by people. They enjoy the company of people.

For Marie-Sylvie Dionne, it is obvious that “the extrovert type needs to be in relationship with others in order to influence, lead, defend, for example.” They need to be surrounded by people at all times. They are struggling to imagine that someone wants to be alone. They also tend to be more optimistic and enthusiastic.

extrovert at work

Extroverts at work

It goes without saying that extroverts are more noticeable at work than introverts. They take up more space and don’t hesitate to put forward their ideas.

However, managers need to pay specific attention to the type of position their extroverted employees occupy; it is imperative that they expend all their energy. If an extrovert finds himself in a position “where his energy is mostly mobilized in introversion or with few contacts, he will quickly become demotivated and will want to change environment”, according to Marie-Sylvie Dionne.

However, managers need to pay specific attention to the type of position their extroverted employees occupy; it is imperative that they expend all their energy. If an extrovert finds himself in a position “where his energy is mostly mobilized in introversion or with few contacts, he will quickly become demotivated and will want to change environment”, according to Marie-Sylvie Dionne.

Extroverted managers probably have an easier time communicating in front of a larger group. Their expressive personality allows them to be very transparent and to have a close relationship with their team members. Communication is their asset!

Extroverts in meeting

In meetings, extroverts don’t hesitate to take their place. This can be unsettling for introverts who find themselves at the same table. While introverts tend to think before they speak, extroverts are not afraid to speak up and share whatever ideas come to mind. They think out loud. Persuasive, they are also able to sell their ideas well, which is why they are often selected.

If you are a manager or leader of the meeting, it is easy for you to run the meeting well. This is harder said than done, but you still need to listen to each participant.

To give introverts a chance to express themselves in the meeting or extroverts a chance to respect the time allotted to topics, use Beenote!

This way you can designate introverts as being in charge of certain topics on the agenda and allow extroverts to develop their listening skills. It’s a win-win situation for both personality types to develop new skills.

Also consider asking questions of people who are quiet, getting their opinions.

In conclusion

If you’re an extrovert, you’re definitely starting out with a head start, since today’s society encourages these personality traits a lot. We like to see people who are comfortable speaking in public, who always want to do more!

However, you shouldn’t forget to give a little more room to introverts who don’t express themselves as easily. You could use your communication skills to help your more introverted team members express themselves better.

What about you, are you an extrovert? What are the qualities that define you?

80% minutes of meeting
Mélanie Lessard
Mélanie Lessard

Marketing Director of Beenote, Melanie loves the world of marketing which is constantly evolving to offer the best product for her clients’ needs. Her primary goal is to help organizations simplify the governance of their boards, committees and teams through good meeting management practices.

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